One Post, Two DNF Books

Hi, readers!

I hope everyone had a great weekend! I spent most of mine reading and doing some much needed book organizing. I’ve been feeling overwhelmed with how many unread books are in my home, which actually makes me less inclined to read. I almost feel paralyzed with choice! And so I took stock of just how many unread books are on my shelves right now. And the number…was over 100.

So I came up with a game plan. I want to read more of my unread books before purchasing new ones. I’ve given myself a target number and every month, I either need to read that many books, get rid of that many books, or some combination of the two. I’m also setting some hard rules about how quickly I need to read a book upon acquiring it and how long I can keep library books. The vast majority of my unread books are ARCs and I want to be in a place where I can actually read these ARCs before the books are published. We’ll see how everything actually goes, and I’ll keep you posted either here or on my Instagram.

Today I want to share some thoughts on two books I started this month and, ultimately, chose to stop reading. I’ve written about not finishing books previously, including this post which details why I do not finish books and also this post, which highlights three books I had recently stopped reading. I choose to share negative reviews on this blog because I think it’s important to be honest. I think all book reviews, both positive and negative, help determine what kinds of books we truly enjoy reading.

Now, onto the books!

The Favorite Sister by Jessica Knoll

I think The Favorite Sister is a great example of a book that does not live up to the hype. This book was heavily promoted this spring and unfortunately falls very flat. To be completely honest, I also stopped reading Knoll’s first book, Luckiest Girl Alive, due to disinterest and frustrating content. I stopped reading The Favorite Sister on page 94. After almost 100 pages, I was not invested in any of the characters and felt the plot, which is a mystery, boring. Curiously, Knoll chose this book to highlight every aspect pertaining to feminism she could think of and then explained them to the reader. I think Knoll was trying to seem relevant and ‘with it’ but the book suffered greatly for it. The plot and pacing dragged under the weight of explanation after explanation of feminism. It almost felt preachy at times. After marking both of Knoll’s books as DNF, I don’t think she’s an author I’ll return to in the future. I would not recommend this book.

The Poppy War by R. F. Kuang

Unfortunately, this book just isn’t for me. I stopped reading at page 192 and only read that far because The Poppy War is highly rated on Goodreads and several friends recommended it. It took several days for me to read almost 200 pages and it was a chore for me to pick this up each time. I found the pacing to be super slow and after almost 200 pages, I felt like I was reading mostly world building with very little plot. I know many people love slow moving novels but they’re just not my cup of tea. My stories need to move along! I also did not connect with any of the characters. Once I realize I don’t care what happens to anyone in a story, it’s difficult for me to enjoy it. I really wanted to enjoy this book but I need to move on to stories I enjoy reading.

That’s it for today! Have you read any of these? Which books have you read recently that you didn’t enjoy?

I am an affiliate with IndieBound and as such, receive a tiny commission should you choose to click through any of the above links and purchase the book(s). Thank you for supporting A Word is Power!

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